Bermuda Triangle is a strange triangular area on the Atlantic ocean where many ships sailing through it or planes flying over it have apparently disappeared without a trace. In few of such cases where wrecks could be found, the crew had vanished. And such incidents have been happening since centuries. 


More than 1,000 ships and planes have disappeared in the triangle area over the past five centuries and such mysterious incidents on the Atlantic continue to take place even at present days. 

 

So getting excited already? Well, the facts however are quite far from what is generally known or believed to be true. Many stories and myths have been created by writers through sheer imagination which they used rampantly to draw publicity to their books. In many cases, the facts got blurred. Many theories, controversies and counter arguments have come up over the years challenging the mysteries that created fear psychosis among people since ages. 



It all started by authors who were novel writers, and the mystery was initially perpetuated by them. But don't jump into a conclusion yet. While we all know that novel writers are good in wild imaginations, but many of these writers were actually popular and well respected authors of their times. However, the mystery started catching wide-scale attention in 1952 when George Sand wrote in Fate magazine about incidents like Flight-19, a training flight of five torpedo bomber planes, all of which went missing during a routine training session in 1945 and never returned. 

 

Subsequently, several authors wrote about various other mysterious incidents in the triangle area. While some of such reports were dubious or without much substance, several incidents had actually occurred and remained unexplained. The words around the mystery started spreading fast, and soon Bermuda Triangle was a reality, at least in the minds of millions all over the world.

Bermuda Triangle is located off the South-Eastern coast of the United States and forms a triangular zone in the Atlantic Ocean. The three corners of the triangle are Miami (in Florida); San Juan (in Puerto Rico); and Bermuda (a north-Atlantic island on which it has been so named). The American author Vincent Gaddis was the first to define this boundary in 1964 in an issue of the magazine named Argosy and called the area 'The Deadly Bermuda Triangle'. 


However, over the years, several other authors kept extending the area beyond its original boundary because they seemed to identify mysterious incidents in nearby areas as well. 


There are many theories behind the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle but the truth is yet to be unveiled and it's still a matter of curiosity for all of us.

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